The Fate of Lee Khan (1973) King Hu

Lee Khan, a high official under Mongolian Emperor Shundi of the Yuan dynasty (year 1366) procures the battle map of the Chinese rebel Chu Yuan-Chang’s army. Rebel spies, aided by treachery within Khan’s ranks, strive to corner him in an inn.

The Fate of Lee Khan (1973) King Hu

The Fate of Lee Khan is a 1973 Hong Kong wuxia film, directed by King Hu.

Plot  (year 1366)

Lee Khan, a high official under Mongolian Emperor Shundi of the Yuan dynasty procures the battle map of the Chinese rebel Chu Yuan-Chang‘s army. Rebel spies, aided by treachery within Khan’s ranks, strive to corner him in an inn.

In the film, Wan Jen-mi is a resistance fighter of the Chinese underground who wants to stop Lee Khan from attaining an important map. All of the resistance fighters want to restore Han rule. The villains are Lee Khan and his female partner Wan’er, who want to prevent the resistance fighters achieving victory.

Historical background
Red Turban Rebellion 1351 – 1368

The Red Turban Rebellion  was an uprising influenced by the White Lotus Society members that, between 1351 and 1368, targeted the ruling Mongol Yuan dynasty, eventually leading to the overthrown of Mongol rule in China. Their movement gained momentum from the famine that resulted from crop failures and floods in the 1330s. Their marauding, which began in the 1350s, took them as far as Korea, where their incursions contributed to the downfall of the Koryŏ dynasty.

One of the Red Turban leader, Zhu Yuanzhang (1328–98) toppled the Yuan dynasty and founded the Ming in 1368.

Lee Khan

Lee Khan, Chaghan Temur (ᠼᠠᠭᠠᠨᠲᠡᠮᠦᠷ; c.1292 – 1362), was a Yuan dynasty Mongolian officer and military leader. His family originated from Central Asia (the Naimans). His great grandfather immigrated to China following the Mongols’ invasion. He himself was from Shenqiu. He obtained the degree of Juren.

Chaghan Temur had raised militia as a response to the Red Turban bandit raids in his hometown in 1531. In 1355, he marched northward and managed to pacify the chaos of Hebei. In 1356, Chaghan Temur was appointed the Bingbu Shangshu (Minister of war).

He was constantly engaged in fighting Red Turban bandits. Chaghan Temur while leading his army to Shandong was assassinated by Wang Shichen, a surrendered leader of farmer riots, and succeeded by his step-son Köke Temür in the year of 1362.

Yuan Shundi

Toghon Temür (ᠲᠣᠭᠠᠨᠲᠡᠮᠦᠷ; 1320 – 1370), was a last emperor (reigned 1333–68) of the Yuan dynasty (1206–1368), under whom the population was provoked into rebellion.

Togon-temür became emperor at the age of 13. In the early years of his reign, power was held by the anti-Chinese minister Bayan. Bayan’s discriminatory policies, together with the deteriorating economic situation of the country, caused widespread rebellion. In 1339 the minister was banished and many of his policies reversed.

Togon-temür’s son became alarmed at the increasing power his father was putting into the hands of Buddhist priests and eunuchs and plotted unsuccessfully to depose him. In 1368, when the foremost rebel leader, Zhu Yuanzhang (1328–98), advanced on the capital at Dadu (now Beijing), Togon-temür disregarded appeals urging him to stay and defend his inheritance. Instead he fled into the steppes of Inner Mongolia and died there two years later, ending the dynasty. He is usually known as (Yuan) Shundi (“Favourable Emperor”), a title given him by the Ming dynasty (1368–1644).

Togon-temür | emperor of Yuan dynasty | Britannica.com